Author Guidelines

Papers submitted for publication must conform to the following guidelines:

  1. Papers should discuss the themes of Islamic studies which are the result of fieldwork and conceptual ideas research from various perspectives, written either in Indonesian, English or Arabic;
  2. Papers must be typed in one-half spaced on A4-paper size with normal margin;
  3. Full name(s) of the author(s) must be stated, along with his/her/their institution and complete address;
  4. Papers’ length is about 6,000-10,000 words;
  5. All submission must include a 150-200 word abstract. The abstract should be typed as concise as possible and should be composed of: problem statement, method, scientific finding results, and short conclusion;
  6. Immediately after the abstract, provide a maximum of 8 keywords, avoiding general and plural terms and multiple concepts (avoid, for example, 'and', 'of').
  7. All submissions should be in OpenOffice, Microsoft Word, RTF, or WordPerfect document file format;
  8. Arabic words should be transliterated according to the style of Islamuna;
  9. Bibliographical reference must be noted in footnote and bibliography according to Islamuna style.
  10. When a source is cited for the first time, full information is provided: full name(s) of author(s), title of the source in italic, place of publication, publishing company, date of publication, and the precise page that is cited. For the following citations of the same source, list the author’s last name, two or three words of the title, and the specific page number(s). The word ibid. may be used, but op.cit., and loc.cit. are not.
  11. The citation should use mendely or zotero system.

Examples of Footnote Style:

  1. Zachari Abuza, Political Islam and Violence in Indonesia (London: Routledge, 2007), p. 15.
  2. Robert W. Hefner, “Shari‘a Politics and Indonesian Democracy”, The Review of Faith & International Affairs, vol. 10, no. 4 (2012), pp. 61-5.
  3. Nasr Hamid Abu Zayd, “Everyday Life, Qur’ān In”, Encyclopaedia of the Qur’ān, ed. by Jane Dammen McAuliffe (Leiden: Brill, 2002), pp. 90-2.    
  4. Ahmad Rafiq, “The Reception of the Qur’an in Indonesia: A case study of the place of the Qur’an in a non Arabic speaking community”, Ph.D. Dissertation (Philadelphia: Temple University, 2014)
  5. Jalāl al-Dīn al-Suyūṭī, al-Itqān fī ‘Ulūm al-Qur’ān (Cairo: Dār al-Ḥadīth, 2009), p. 91.
  6. Putu Setia, “Wisata Halal,” Tempo, March 2, 2019, https://kolom.tempo.co/read/1181028/wisata-halal/full&view=ok, accessed 25 March 2019.

Examples of Bibliography Style:

Abuza, Zachari. 2007. Political Islam and Violence in Indonesia. London: Routledge.

Baso, Ahmad. 2002. Plesetan lokalitas: politik pribumisasi Islam. Jakarta: Diterbitkan atas kerjasama the Asian Fondation [dengan] Desantara. http://books.google.com/books?id=H_7XAAAAMAAJ

Hefner, Robert W. 2012. “Shari‘a Politics and Indonesian Democracy.” The Review of Faith & International Affairs, 10 (4): 61-65.

Rafiq, Ahmad. 2014. “The Reception of the Qur’an in Indonesia: A case study of the place of the Qur’an in a non Arabic speaking community.” Ph.D. Dissertation, Temple University, Philadelphia.

Setia, Putu. “Wisata Halal.” Tempo, March 2, 2019, https://kolom.tempo.co/read/1181028/wisata-halal/full&view=ok, accessed 25 March 2019.

Suyūṭī, Jalāl al-Dīn (al-). 2009. al-Itqān fī ‘Ulūm al-Qur’ān. Cairo: Dār al-Ḥadīth.

Zayd, Nasr Hamid Abu. 2002. “Everyday Life, Qur’ān In.” In Encyclopaedia of the Qur’ān, ed. by Jane Dammen McAuliffe, 90-92. Leiden: Brill.